© Graham Rabbitts 2016: You are welcome to use original material from this website, but please acknowledge the source

The Teal Directory

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Big Issues


© Graham Rabbitts 2016: You are welcome to use original material from this website, but please acknowledge the source

Mooring

Although we kept Teal in the new Yacht Haven at Royal Southern YC in Hamble for the first winter, our intention was to keep her in the summer on a swinging mooring at Marchwood. Once again, we would not have access to shore power.


Luckily, the Hardy Commodore 36 was designed to have a generator, and we found that the space had not been compromised. Even more fortunate was that the supplier, Fischer Panda, were located nearby at Ringwood. So the generator was installed in Poole where the boat was bought before we made the delivery trip to Marchwood in Southampton Water.






Cruising needs

Teal had always been kept in a marina, almost permanently plugged in to shore power.


With less than 300 hours on the engines in 12 years, she had not had much use. We, on the other hand, would want to visit places like Newtown, Keyhaven, Chichester, and South Deep in Poole harbour. In all these harbours we would be at anchor, and would not have access to shore power. And Teal has 2 fridges to sustain!


Reserved for image of generator


The Tender

On a mooring we would also need a tender. Teal had no dinghy (other than the liferaft).


We already had an 8ft Walker Bay dinghy which, with its inflatable fender would make an excellent tender. But its curved sides would not work on standard snap davits on the swimming platform. Eventually we found that Weaver, the Snap Davit manufacturer had developed a frame to take the Walker Bay. We think we were the first to import the kit from the USA. It was expensive, but it works.

The only downside is that it adds quite a lot of weight to the dinghy.


It also means that we have a sailing dinghy to use when visiting the serene harbours mentioned earlier.





Click on gallery to the left for details of the Walker Bay installation